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The Block Auction Results 2014

Chris & Jenna's Apartment

Chris & Jenna’s Apartment

Last night the nation tuned in to watch the finale of Channel 9’s The Block. Whether you’ve followed the series since the beginning, watched a few episodes here and there or purely just switched on to see the results, we were all watching and everyone’s talking today!

Last year the contestants took home over $500,000 each, a big difference to this year’s results…
  • The boys Simon & Shannon won this years series and took home $445,000 ($100,000 prize money plus $335,000 profit)
  • 2nd place Chris & Jenna walked away with $310,000
  • 3rd place Max and Karstan received $40,000
Shannon & Simon's Apartment

Shannon & Simon’s Apartment

Darren & Dee and Michael & Carlene walked away with just $10,000 for their efforts over the last 10 weeks. As news.com.au calculated, their efforts were worth $10.21 per hour based on a 16 hour working day over 7 days a week, including the $700 per week away-from-home allowance received from Channel 9! To sum it up, these two couples worked for just over half of the hourly minimum wage.

This morning I asked our Managing Director Kylie Emans about the results and her response as a real estate agent was: “the property market has spoken, now that was reality! The only reality in that reality tv show!”

Michael & Carlene's Apartment

Michael & Carlene’s Apartment

All those people lining up to look and all of us watching on TV but who are the buyers? 3 bidders stood out and the first auction stalled before a bidding war between two parties kicked off (what a relief that was!), but they were all the same buyers (even some familiar faces from previous seasons) bidding on each apartment, what a joke!

Now everyone is pointing the blame – were the reserves set too high? Are the auctioneer’s to blame? Did the bidders have inside information? Or was it all down to the order of the auctions? (despite the majority of couples wanting to go towards the end!)

One thing’s for sure, it definitely shows the unpredictable nature of the property market!Source: http://www.news.com.au/entertainment/tv/the-block-darren-and-deanne-and-michael-and-carlene-earnt-just-1071-per-hour-for-their-efforts/story-fn8yvfst-1227088489917

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Don’t Overpay On Advertising When Selling Your Home

Real estate advertising has come so far since I first started in the industry. I remember as the salesperson, having to take the photos on a camera using film, then walk up to the local chemist to have them developed, $15 and an hour later we would realise the photos were not all that good and needed a second take but having to meet a print deadline we would have to pick the best of a bad bunch.

Web_18

14 Randell Ave, Lilli Pilli

Now we have such sophisticated technology for marketing at our fingertips with specialists for every step of that process, whether it is the photographer or stylist, I would not dare to pick up a camera to photograph a vendor’s property. At the same time, the cost of advertising has decreased significantly as print media falls by the wayside.

241 Attunga Rd, Yowie Bay

241 Attunga Rd, Yowie Bay

At Beach & Bay Realty we have taken a simple approach to marketing that encompasses a substantial online presence, including social media, with print media including brochures and signboards to reinforce the online experience.  We have designed our marketing packages to be best value for money without compromising on the quality of the advertising. It is no longer necessary to spend $10,000 on a marketing campaign.

5/5 McDonald St, Cronulla

5/5 McDonald St, Cronulla

Buyers are busy people, they want the information at their fingertips and this is why real estate websites have become the norm for finding buyers. Print media advertising such as our local paper is great for a coffee table read but if you are actively looking for a home or investment property, by the time that property is advertised in the paper, the agent is exchanging contracts with the buyer who found it online.

We have also sold several homes from our local  social media marketing, including the “I love Cronulla” Facebook page and Beach & Bay’s Instagram page (instagram @beachandbayrealty). With 8000 followers on Facebook, people know we know the area and check our updates daily.

15 Seaforth Ave, Woolooware

15 Seaforth Ave, Woolooware

If a vendor would like to advertise in newsprint the option is always there but we like to encourage our vendors to spend their money where it is best going to seen by active buyers. We look at it from the angle that if we were selling our own home or investment property where would we spend our money on advertising?

This is what we stand by, it works, it works fast and we have done it ourselves:

  • Professional photography – we believe our photographer is the best in the area
  • Floorplan
  • Virtual Floorplan or video
  • Websites – as many as you can be on
  • Colour brochure with floorplan
  • Signboard
  • Social media
  • 17 Bass St, Port Hacking

    17 Bass St, Port Hacking

    On-site Auctioneer if market and property suitable

This can all be done for less than $3000.

Happy Selling!

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Misleading and Incorrect Auction Reporting

I have just read the Sunday Telegraph’s property section and in particular under the “Sales action: South”, after attending several of the auctions reported here on Saturday and taking into consideration that I must be objective, there are several discrepancies but none more glaringly obvious as the paragraph regarding the property result in Lilli Pilli.

One of my staff attended this auction. If there were 3 bidders they must have all have introverted personalities to the extreme as no hands were raised which therefore makes it very difficult to pass the property in to a bidder at $3.1mil? Which begs the question, which auction did the writer of this editorial attend? From the article I would say none and definitely not the one in Lilli Pilli which had only one bid, a vendor bid of $3.1mil. I had assumed that these pieces were written by journalists that had attended the particular auctions they focused their articles on. Now that I understand that reporters are reliant on getting the information 2nd hand from the agent it explains why reporting of general market conditions can be so off the pulse and so far from reality. Any buyer/seller/person interested in real estate reading that article would think that 3 bidders competed for that property up until $3.1mil at which point negotiations stalled. In actual fact, no bidder put up their hand.

It is an offense of the Property, Stock and Business Agents Act 2002 for an agent to report that a property passed in when in fact it passed in with a vendor bid.  Since launching our auction tracking system we have noticed many discrepancies with what results are recorded for in the Sunday papers but none has been so inconsistent from an editorial piece.

To be fair when I checked the Sun Herald’s real estate section, the Home Price Guide’s auction results show the property passing in, no figure available but at least they didn’t embellish the  result in a paragraph of incorrect, misleading reporting.

I think the media has a responsibility if they are going to report on the real estate market that some effort is made to check accuracy.

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Auction Series Part 8: When is the Reserve Price Set?

The reserve price is the amount the vendor is prepared to sell for on auction day.

The reserve is normally set a few days before the auction. The auction can not be held without a reserve price in writing and in fact it is the first condition of the “Prescribed Conditions of Sale by Auction” which must be on display at an auction.

During the marketing campaign the agent will update the vendor on price feedback from potential buyers. Most agents will meet their clients a day or so prior to the auction to set the reserve (also a vendor bid).

This is put in writing so that it can be given to the auctioneer on auction day.

Things to note:

  • The reserve price can be changed during the auction. It can be increased or decreased!
  • The auctioneer no longer has to declare that a property is ‘on the market’ – ie. it has reached the reserve, so don’t wait to bid

If you missed the last post or any of the others in this auction advice series, check out part 7 – Vendor bid vs Reserve Price

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A Bidder’s Guide For Auction Day

Most people know that you need to register prior to bidding at a residential property auction. You don’t have to bid, once registered, but if there is even the remotest of chances that you might be tempted to put up your hand and bid you need to register prior to the Auction.

The NSW Office of Fair Trading has a Bidder’s Guide that explains what ID you need to register and the finer details of who should register if say, you are a couple, or you are bidding on behalf of another party. The agent selling the property also has Bidders Guides on hand at the auction.

The main things to remember are:

  • Bring proof of identity which shows your name and address and is a government issued or financial institution card or document, most people bring their driver’s licence
  • Other options are council rates, vehicle registration papers
  • Remember passports do not have your address included
  • See the Bidder’s Guide for other options

At registration:

  • When you register the agent will take your name, address and number of proof of identity and give you a bidder’s number
  • If you register with the agent prior to Auction day you need to show your proof of identity again on the day and the agent will give you a bidder’s number
  • If you arrive late, you need to register with the agent but you can put up your hand to let the Auctioneer know you want to make a bid once you are registered

Some points that you might not know:

  • The agent is not allowed to use your details for marketing purposes ie sell to a 3rd party
  • The agent can not show the vendor your details, or anyone else
  • Post auction the Bidder’s Record is stored securely by the agent

If you are not comfortable or confident about bidding on the property of your dreams you can employ a “Buyer’s Agent” to do this for you. More on that in a future blog…

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